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Need Braces? Don't Do-It-Yourself


The trend of do-it-yourself braces is sweeping the country, but many dentists and orthodontists warn patients that taking matters into their own hands could be dangerous and cause long-term damage. A quick Google search unlocks a plethora of DIY tutorials and videos ranging from how to grow your own windowsill herb garden to how to turn your bike into a Pokémon Go machine to how to make your own braces. While people may feel DIY braces are a cheaper alternative to going to the orthodontist to be fitted for braces, it may end of costing more in the long run.

According to a recent survey from the American Association of Orthodontists, 13 percent of orthodontists see patients who have attempted DIY teeth straightening.2 While the process of DIY braces may sound easy and quick, they can ultimately do more harm than good.[1] Reports indicate people are using rubber bands around two front teeth to draw the teeth together, closing the gap. Medical professionals say this may sound simple enough, but because the rubber band could imbed itself into the gum leading to an infection, it’s much more dangerous than people think. Additionally, the rubber band can travel to the root of the tooth causing the tooth to fall out.

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2638 Hits

Treating Our Tiniest Patients Early On

Many parents are told by their child’s dentist or orthodontist that correcting a misaligned bite or crooked teeth while their child doesn’t have their permanent teeth yet isn’t possible or effective. While putting braces on baby teeth isn’t a valid option, there are alternatives to correct jaw and teeth issues while your child is still young. In fact, Dr. Buck prefers to work with his tiniest patients sooner rather than later, and here’s why.

If your child has crooked teeth or a misaligned bite, leaving the issue untreated can lead to long-term issues such as sleep apnea or TMJ disorder. But the traditional orthodontic approach is to wait to treat the issue until the child’s permanent teeth have come in. According to Dr. Buck, while this approach may be easier, you miss significant growth opportunities that allow you to fully treat the issue in one shot.

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1723 Hits

Untreated Sleep Apnea Could Cause Brain Damage in Children

New research suggests that children suffering from untreated obstructive sleep apnea show a significant reduction in gray matter of the brain. The study conducted by the University of Chicago Medical Center and published in the journal, Scientific Reports, conveys that "there is clear evidence of widespread neuronal damage or loss compared to the general population." [1] The findings of this recent study are especially troubling as it’s estimated that currently, three percent of children suffer from sleep apnea.

The University of Chicago Medical Center study analyzed 16 children with OSA and evaluated their sleep patterns overnight in its pediatric sleep laboratory. Children were administered neuro-cognitive testing and underwent brain scans with a non-invasive MRI. These results were compared with MRI images from nine healthy children of the same age, gender, ethnicity and weight, who did not suffer from sleep apnea.  

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3544 Hits

Sweet Pickings: Could Strawberries Help Fight Oral Cancer?

According to a new pilot study conducted at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute, strawberries may help fight oral cancer in heavy smokers. April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month, so these findings come at an appropriate time. Presently, the Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that almost 50,000 Americans are diagnosed with oral cancer each year. With so many people being diagnosed annually, new preventative discoveries are especially crucial.

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1386 Hits

What's Eating You: How Diet Impacts Migraines

A 2016 study confirms that diet can directly impact the prevalence of migraines. The saying, "you are what you eat" could not be truer when discussing diet and migraines. According to the Migraine Research Foundation, migraines are a serious neurological disease affecting roughly 38 million Americans. It is the sixth most disabling illness in the world. Certain beverages, foods and food additives are known to trigger migraines and reducing or eliminating them completely can provide noticeable relief.

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1807 Hits

Chronic Headaches? Your Mouth May be to Blame

An improper bite could be the root of chronic headaches and migraines. People blame their headaches on many things including stress, lack of sleep and even dehydration. Yet most people don’t realize chronic headaches may be the result of a misaligned bite. When Dr. Buck sees a patient experiencing chronic headaches, he first examines their bite. What he frequently finds is a misaligned bite, or malocclusion, triggers the headaches.

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1647 Hits

Oral Health and Overall Health: How Each Impacts the Other

Oral health offers both clues to the state of overall health and allows dentists to identify health issues before other medical providers. Because people typically visit their dentists twice a year, dentists are usually the first to notice health problems. The state of our oral health is also a sign for other serious medical issues.

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1394 Hits

Sick and Tired: How the Immune System Suffers When We Don’t Sleep

A new study suggests that chronic sleep deprivation can negatively impact the immune system, leading to an increased incidence of illness. The study, conducted by the University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine, confirms how the immune system is compromised when the body is not fully rested. Many factors can cause and contribute to sleep deprivation, so it is important to recognize the signs and risk factors to combat sleep deprivation early on.

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1815 Hits

A Royal Pain: How and Why Chronic Pain Affects Women Greater than Men

A recent study conducted by Georgia State University found that women experienced higher incidences of chronic, inflammatory pain than men and that pain medications like morphine are thereby a less effective pain management tool. According to the Institute of Medicine, more than 100 million Americans suffer from some form of chronic pain, with women compromising the bulk of that. The American Chronic Pain Association defines chronic pain as an "ongoing or recurrent pain, lasting beyond the usual course of acute illness or injury or more than 3 to 6 months, and which adversely affects the individual’s well-being." [1] For many women, chronic pain can present in a variety of ways including fibromyalgia, arthritis, headaches and even temporomandibular joint disorder, more commonly known as TMJ. The Georgia State University Study sheds new light on how women are suffering substantially more than their male counterparts and why that just might be.

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1271 Hits

Feel No Pain: Treating TMJ Pain with Neuromuscular Dentistry

In the U.S., more than 10 million people suffer from temporomandibular joint disorder, more commonly known as TMJ, and most traditional treatment options can be invasive. TMJ-related pain can affect a patient’s day-to-day life. Patients frequently suffer from chronic headaches or migraines and jaw pain. Dr. Buck specializes in treating TMJ and uses a unique approach that patients are hard-pressed to find anywhere else. His methods are different and considerably less invasive than traditional treatments for TMJ, and that’s why he’s seeing more patients choosing to seek treatment at his office.

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1709 Hits

Chronic Pain Bites the Dust: Correcting the Bite with Orthotic Therapy

For people who suffer from chronic pain and headaches that are symptomatic of TMJ, realigning and correcting the bite can make all the difference. TMJ patients generally suffer from a range of symptoms including chronic headaches or migraines, jaw pain, and tenderness, difficulty chewing, facial pain and locking of the temporomandibular joints. Yet, what many people don’t realize about the disorder is that a misaligned bite is almost always the root cause. With over 15 years of experience in treating TMJ patients, Dr. Buck’s unique treatment focuses on realigning the bite to relieve TMJ-related pain and symptoms.

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2254 Hits

Up All Night? TMJ May be to Blame

If you’re not getting a good night’s sleep and can’t figure out why, temporomandibular joint disorder, more commonly known as TMJ, may be to blame. TMJ is a serious condition that is characterized by pain in the jaw joint and the muscles controlling jaw movement that can impact jaw mobility, and unbeknownst to many Americans, it could be the source of their sleep loss.  

 

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  1330 Hits
1330 Hits

Wear Your Smile Well: Why a Properly Aligned Smile is Important

Whether you’re the CEO of a multi-billion-dollar company, a public relations professional helping put your company’s best face forward or a barista at a local coffee shop, your smile matters. We may not like to admit it, but having crooked teeth or a misaligned bite can change the overall attractiveness of our smile. Your smile is one of the first things people notice about you, so for many people, fixing dental issues becomes paramount, and Dr. Buck understands that. In fact, there are many ways that a misaligned bite or crooked teeth can impact our lives.

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  1740 Hits
1740 Hits

Saying a Mouthful: How Our Ancestors Teeth Tell An Evolutionary Story

Anthropologists have learned a great deal about human evolution from fossilized remains, and one of the most information-rich sources are human teeth. Our teeth, as well as our ancestor's teeth, tell a very specific evolutionary story, and it's a story anthropologists have been "reading" for many years. Because teeth are typically the most preserved skeletal remains found in fossils, they are a natural fit for researchers to examine.In her new book, "What Teeth Reveal about Human Evolution," Ohio State University anthropology professor Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg discusses how and why modern human teeth are vastly different from our ancestors. The thread that weaves its way through the entirety of her book is that "we have teeth that were adapted for eating a very different diet than the one we eat today"  and how, as a result, that reality can cause a number of health issues and concerns.

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1661 Hits

Not a Wink of Sleep: How Sleep Deprivation Impacts Memories

In a recent study conducted by scientists at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the study involving mice showed how sleep deprivation and other factors that disrupt the sleep cycle could inhibit the brain’s ability to form new memories. With somewhere between 50 and 70 million Americans suffering from a sleep disorder, sleep deprivation could be significantly more prevalent among this population. The Johns Hopkins study states that the "key purpose of sleep is to recalibrate the brain cells responsible for learning and memory so the animals can "solidify" lessons learned and use them when they awaken,"  and anything that impacts the sleep cycle could change the trajectory of human memory.

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1312 Hits

A Waste of Breath: How Mouth-breathing is Hurting Your Child

Not all breathing is created equal, and what’s surprising to many parents is how mouth-breathing is harmful to their children. Mouth-breathing in early childhood can lead to a number of health issues such as sleep deprivation and sleep apnea. In fact, current research suggests a link between poor sleep and ADHD. Dr. Buck routinely sees young patients in his practice who struggle with mouth-breathing. The goal is to get these kiddos breathing out of their noses, also known as nasal breathing. With some help and support from Dr. Buck, parents can make this happen.

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  2604 Hits
2604 Hits

Three Things that Make TMJ Worse...and One That Can Help

Living with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ) can be a serious pain, and certain habits can increase pain and discomfort. With so many people suffering from this sometimes debilitating disorder, it might come as a surprise that some of those people are doing more damage by exacerbating their symptoms. In his practice, Dr. Buck treats many patients with TMJ, and he’s quick to remind them to steer clear of several harmful habits that can make their pain worse.

TMJ can be a very painful condition, and it’s often made worse when patients don’t take the diagnosis as seriously as they should. Here are several things that can make TMJ symptoms worse and one that can help.

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9374 Hits

Losing Sleep and Dollars: How Undiagnosed Sleep Apnea is Costing America Billions

More than 13 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, and with many of those people not being treated or even diagnosed, it comes as no surprise that this treatable disorder is doing more than keeping Americans up at night; it’s costing them some serious dollars. In August 2016, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) released the results of an analysis that effectively breaks down how untreated and undiagnosed sleep apnea is costing America more than $150 billion every year. What’s perhaps more problematic is these staggering costs aren’t necessary and can be significantly reduced (if not eliminated) by properly diagnosing and treating sleep apnea.

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1235 Hits

Sinking into Depression? Why Social Media Use May be to Blame

The wide accessibility of social media platforms on electronic devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and computers has given rise to a number of health conditions, including depression. In fact, the excessive use of social media among young adults could lead to an increased risk for depression as well as other health issues. According to a national survey conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Center for Research on Media, Technology and Health (CRMTH), "people who report using seven to 11 social media platforms had more than three times the risk of depression and anxiety than their peers who use zero to two platforms."[1] While the ability to stay plugged in in this fast-paced society has become the norm, it is fraught with peril.

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1378 Hits

Early Introduction of Peanut Foods and Epigenetics Could Affect Peanut Allergy Development

Peanut allergies affect an estimated three million people in the U.S., and while there is currently no known cure or treatment, new research suggests that introducing peanut-containing foods during infancy may help prevent the development of a peanut allergy. As of January 2017, an expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) issued this new recommendation for peanut-containing foods. While these new guidelines may help reduce the incidence of children developing peanut allergies, a 2015 study suggests that genes and epigenetics also play a role.

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1334 Hits

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DR. BUCK'S PHILOSOPHY

Epigenetic Orthodontics can open and protect the airway enhancing breathing both during sleep and awake activities.

Dr. Buck practices a philosophy that integrates airway into all diagnosis and treatments. Dentistry has traditionally not considered the airway when planning dental treatments. Fortunately, today there is a rapidly growing movement that now recognizes how dentistry can have an impact on the airway which affects breathing during sleep. If dental treatments, including TMJ, orthopedic and orthodontics are well planned the result can be that the airway is protected or even enhanced. There is a clear link between underdeveloped and retruded jaws together with narrow dental arches that puts a patient at risk for sleep breathing disorders.

Please visit this site for more information; Airway Health

WOW! A 54% decrease in forward head posture; 164% increase in the antero-posterior size of the airway; 176% increase in the lateral size of the airway all from epigenetically centered jaw development orthopedics. This is the future of orthodontics!​
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