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A New Link

Are you putting off your next dental cleaning? If you're regularly rescheduling, you may want to rethink that plan.Skipping the dentist isn't just bad for your mouth - it's also bad for your gut, according to a new collaborative study from the University of Michigan Medical and Dental Schools.The study has found that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD...
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324 Hits

Not Just What, but How?

 You may already know that what you eat impacts your waistline, but did you know that what you eat can affect your oral health, too?Researchers from Japan have shown how eating can affect the makeup and balance of microbes in the oral and gut biomes.The results, published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology in December 2019, sh...
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320 Hits

Sleep Apnea Linked to 'Alzheimer-Like' Changes in the Brain

Sleep apnea is scary. It may seem like just an annoying sleep habit that often shows up as snoring, but it can be incredibly dangerous and cause other health conditions which can even result in death in the most serious cases. It's not something to be taken likely in children or adults and now researchers in France have found another concerning mar...
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367 Hits

What Is Digital Smile Design?

​What do you do when your smile makes you unhappy? We feel happier and a lot more confident when we smile, and we exude a kind of positivity. So when we're unhappy with our smile, we smile less often and it can actually begin to affect our confidence and mood.A Cosmetic Procedure That Enhances Your SmileWhen you deal with a smile you're less than h...
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  1471 Hits
1471 Hits

New Study Shows SPG Block Effective for Migraine Relief

Research from the Society of Interventional Radiology found that an SPG, or sphenopalatine ganglion, block significantly decreases headache pain scores in children who suffer from migraines. More than 300 treatments were conducted on 200 patients who ranged in age from 7 to 18 at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Using a 10-point scale to record pain, researchers found that after the SPG block was performed, pain scores were lowered by more than two points on average.

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3009 Hits

An Emerging Role for Stem Cells in the Dental Industry

A research team from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, has developed a way to quadruple the number of stem cells harvested from extracted wisdom tooth root pulp. The stem cells are being studied for their ability to treat a variety of medical conditions.

Tooth roots are especially appealing to scientists and medical researchers because they are home to two types of valuable stem cells. Pluripotent stem cells can become almost any type of cell while multipotent stem cells can become very specific types of cells.

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2501 Hits

Hot Flashes Linked to Sleep Apnea

A new study published in the journal of the North American Menopause Society examines the potential link between hot flashes and obstructive sleep apnea in menopausal women. Researchers discovered that women who reported experiencing severe hot flashes were 1.87 times more at risk for obstructive sleep apnea than those who reported only mild or no hot flashes.

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  1833 Hits
1833 Hits

Could Glass Toothpaste Help Repair Damaged Teeth?

A research team from Queen Mary University in London have developed a new "bioactive" glass designed to help repair decaying teeth. The glass dissolves quickly to form chemicals that mimic tooth minerals to help restore the damaged teeth. The toothpaste has already been launched by the university's company, BioMin Technologies Ltd., under the name BioMinC. Last year, the team developed a fluoride-containing glass toothpaste called BioMinF. The new product, BioMinC, uses chloride-containing glass as an alternative for those who choose to forego fluoride toothpaste or for those in areas where the water is already fluoridated.

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  2495 Hits
2495 Hits

Are Cavities Contagious?

We all dread cold and flu season, when every cough or sneeze from a neighbor could spell disaster for not only ourselves, but also the whole family. But who would have thought that sharing food and drinks or swapping spit in a kiss would also leave us more at risk for cavities?  

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  1705 Hits
1705 Hits

Could This Medication Help Treat Sleep Apnea?

According to a new study from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University, researchers believe they have discovered a drug that could lower the frequency of apneic episodes in patients with sleep apnea. The medication, dronabinol, is currently used to help chemotherapy patients deal with nausea and vomiting during treatments.  

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  1714 Hits
1714 Hits

Sleep Apnea Linked to Memory and Attention Problems

New research published recently in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society shows a newly discovered link between sleep-breathing disorders such as sleep apnea and problems with memory and paying attention.  

The study looked at 1,700 adults using technology in their home environment to measures things like oxygen levels and other functions during sleep. Researchers determined that those with less than 90 percent oxygen saturation levels, which is a clear marker for sleep apnea, scored much lower on memory and attention tests. Researchers believe the lack of oxygen can damage blood vessels in the brain and cause inflammation that can result in nerve cell loss and lead to cognitive problems. 

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  2118 Hits
2118 Hits

Marijuana Causes Dry Mouth: Why it Matters

As the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes, and in some states recreational purposes, becomes more widespread, it’s important to look into one of the most well-known side effects of its use. Dry mouth, or xerostoma in the medical and dental community, occurs for many reasons. It can be a side effect of medication, a medical condition or the result of using marijuana.

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  2831 Hits
2831 Hits

New Study Shows Link Between Feelings of Purpose in Life and Better Sleep

 New research from a study conducted at Northwestern University in Chicago has found that a sense of purpose in life could help people sleep better. The study looked at over 800 people ages 60 to 100. Question about sleep quality and motivations in life were the core focus of the study and the researchers discovered that those who felt their lives had more meaning were actually less likely to have sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome along with a higher quality of sleep overall. The new study was published in the journal of Sleep Science and Practice.

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2292 Hits

Walks on the Beach May Help Improve Dental Anxiety

 Most people dread going to the dentist for even the most common treatments, but what if you could transport yourself to another world during the procedure? Researchers at the University of Plymouth set out to discover if using virtual reality in a dental setting could help improve patient experience and their findings were very interesting.

The study separated participants into three groups. The first group, the control group, received their dental treatments as usual with no distractions or interventions. The second group used a virtual reality headset to stroll through the streets of a random city during their procedure. The third group wore the virtual reality headsets and walked along a beach in Devon, England.

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  2154 Hits
2154 Hits

A Smarter Way to Sleep: Using Smartphones to Diagnose Sleep Disorders

Sleep disorders are often evaluated and diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG), which measures brain activity, eye movement and heart rhythms during sleep, but a new type of technology designed by researchers out of Osaka University utilizes a smartphone to help diagnose sleep disorders. It uses machine learning via a smartphone to help determine if a patient is suffering from a sleep disorder.

Using Modern Technology to Diagnose Sleep Disorders
According to Osaka University Associate Professor Ken-ichi Fukui, PSGs are ineffective because they require a patient to be monitored outside of their natural sleeping environment, typically in a sleep lab or other medical facility. He believes that because "our environment influences how we sleep...we should not expect the same patterns sleeping at a hospital [versus] or sleeping at home."[1] This could be why so many people aren’t diagnosed with a sleep disorder, even though they really do have one.

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  1541 Hits
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1541 Hits

Added Weight in Childhood Leads to Added Risk of Depression

New research from the Association for the Study of Obesity suggests that being overweight, especially during childhood, could increase the risk of developing major depression later in life. The CDC states that "the percentage of children with obesity in the U.S. has more than tripled since the 1970s," and that "today, about one in five school-aged children (ages 6–19) has obesity."[1] And with those added pounds comes the added risk for developing depression later in life.

The CDC defines obesity as "having excess body fat [which is] measured using the body mass index, or BMI, a widely-used screening tool for measuring both overweight and obesity...Children at or above the 95th percentile have obesity."1 Previous studies have shown that people who are obese are a greater risk of developing depression, but the new study from the Association for the Study of Obesity closely examined the link between early-life obesity and depression risk. The study, which analyzed 889 participants, found "that being overweight at age 8 or 13 was associated with more than triple the risk of developing major depression at some point in their lives, whilst carrying excess weight over a lifetime (both as a child and as an adult) quadrupled the chance of developing depression compared to only being overweight as an adult."[2]   

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  1275 Hits
1275 Hits

Untreated Sleep Apnea Could Cause Brain Damage in Children

New research suggests that children suffering from untreated obstructive sleep apnea show a significant reduction in gray matter of the brain. The study conducted by the University of Chicago Medical Center and published in the journal, Scientific Reports, conveys that "there is clear evidence of widespread neuronal damage or loss compared to the general population." [1] The findings of this recent study are especially troubling as it’s estimated that currently, three percent of children suffer from sleep apnea.

The University of Chicago Medical Center study analyzed 16 children with OSA and evaluated their sleep patterns overnight in its pediatric sleep laboratory. Children were administered neuro-cognitive testing and underwent brain scans with a non-invasive MRI. These results were compared with MRI images from nine healthy children of the same age, gender, ethnicity and weight, who did not suffer from sleep apnea.  

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  3377 Hits
3377 Hits

Sweet Pickings: Could Strawberries Help Fight Oral Cancer?

According to a new pilot study conducted at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute, strawberries may help fight oral cancer in heavy smokers. April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month, so these findings come at an appropriate time. Presently, the Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that almost 50,000 Americans are diagnosed with oral cancer each year. With so many people being diagnosed annually, new preventative discoveries are especially crucial.

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  1270 Hits
1270 Hits

Chronic Headaches? Your Mouth May be to Blame

An improper bite could be the root of chronic headaches and migraines. People blame their headaches on many things including stress, lack of sleep and even dehydration. Yet most people don’t realize chronic headaches may be the result of a misaligned bite. When Dr. Buck sees a patient experiencing chronic headaches, he first examines their bite. What he frequently finds is a misaligned bite, or malocclusion, triggers the headaches.

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  1515 Hits
1515 Hits

Oral Health and Overall Health: How Each Impacts the Other

Oral health offers both clues to the state of overall health and allows dentists to identify health issues before other medical providers. Because people typically visit their dentists twice a year, dentists are usually the first to notice health problems. The state of our oral health is also a sign for other serious medical issues.

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  1274 Hits
1274 Hits

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DR. BUCK'S PHILOSOPHY

Epigenetic Orthodontics can open and protect the airway enhancing breathing both during sleep and awake activities.

Dr. Buck practices a philosophy that integrates airway into all diagnosis and treatments. Dentistry has traditionally not considered the airway when planning dental treatments. Fortunately, today there is a rapidly growing movement that now recognizes how dentistry can have an impact on the airway which affects breathing during sleep. If dental treatments, including TMJ, orthopedic and orthodontics are well planned the result can be that the airway is protected or even enhanced. There is a clear link between underdeveloped and retruded jaws together with narrow dental arches that puts a patient at risk for sleep breathing disorders.

Please visit this site for more information; Airway Health

WOW! A 54% decrease in forward head posture; 164% increase in the antero-posterior size of the airway; 176% increase in the lateral size of the airway all from epigenetically centered jaw development orthopedics. This is the future of orthodontics!​
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