2322 196th St. SW, Suite 201 Lynnwood, WA 98036  |  Call Us Today! 206-316-8286

DSCN1769.jpeg
Slide 2
PlayPause
Slider

Marijuana Causes Dry Mouth: Why it Matters

As the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes, and in some states recreational purposes, becomes more widespread, it’s important to look into one of the most well-known side effects of its use. Dry mouth, or xerostoma in the medical and dental community, occurs for many reasons. It can be a side effect of medication, a medical condition or the result of using marijuana.

Continue reading
  1040 Hits
1040 Hits

New Study Shows Link Between Feelings of Purpose in Life and Better Sleep

 New research from a study conducted at Northwestern University in Chicago has found that a sense of purpose in life could help people sleep better. The study looked at over 800 people ages 60 to 100. Question about sleep quality and motivations in life were the core focus of the study and the researchers discovered that those who felt their lives had more meaning were actually less likely to have sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome along with a higher quality of sleep overall. The new study was published in the journal of Sleep Science and Practice.

Continue reading
  1028 Hits
1028 Hits

Walks on the Beach May Help Improve Dental Anxiety

 Most people dread going to the dentist for even the most common treatments, but what if you could transport yourself to another world during the procedure? Researchers at the University of Plymouth set out to discover if using virtual reality in a dental setting could help improve patient experience and their findings were very interesting.

The study separated participants into three groups. The first group, the control group, received their dental treatments as usual with no distractions or interventions. The second group used a virtual reality headset to stroll through the streets of a random city during their procedure. The third group wore the virtual reality headsets and walked along a beach in Devon, England.

Continue reading
  1060 Hits
1060 Hits

SPG Block Helps Migraine Sufferers Find Relief

According to the Migraine Research Foundation, migraines affect 38 million Americans and one billion people worldwide including men, women and children. It’s the third most common illness in the world and the sixth most disabling. In fact, every 10 seconds, someone in the United States visits the emergency room for head pain said Dr. David Buck, DDS, a neuromuscular dentist in Washington.

"Migraines are considered chronic when a patient experiences at least 15 a month over the course of three months," he said. "People who don’t suffer from these painful attacks have the tendency to brush them off as just bad headaches with little sympathy for the patient. But, 90 percent of migraine sufferers can’t function at all, let alone work, drive or socialize during a migraine."

Continue reading
  853 Hits
853 Hits

The Serious and Somber Reality of Sleep Apnea

With the recent news that actress Carrie Fisher died as a result of sleep apnea and other additional complications, this serious health condition is making headlines across the country. Though officials cannot conclusively determine the exact cause of death, it appears that sleep apnea likely played a role. If left untreated, sleep apnea is harmful to your health and can quickly become dangerous.

What is Sleep Apnea?
The Greek word "apnea" translates to "without breath. As such, sleep apnea is a structural problem characterized by repeated cessations or pauses in breathing during sleep. Typically, the airway collapses during deeper levels of sleep, compromising breathing and interrupting sleep. Millions of American suffer from the disorder, and it affects their everyday way of life, impacting work performance, personal relationships and daily functioning.

Continue reading
  938 Hits
Tags:
938 Hits

A Smarter Way to Sleep: Using Smartphones to Diagnose Sleep Disorders

Sleep disorders are often evaluated and diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG), which measures brain activity, eye movement and heart rhythms during sleep, but a new type of technology designed by researchers out of Osaka University utilizes a smartphone to help diagnose sleep disorders. It uses machine learning via a smartphone to help determine if a patient is suffering from a sleep disorder.

Using Modern Technology to Diagnose Sleep Disorders
According to Osaka University Associate Professor Ken-ichi Fukui, PSGs are ineffective because they require a patient to be monitored outside of their natural sleeping environment, typically in a sleep lab or other medical facility. He believes that because "our environment influences how we sleep...we should not expect the same patterns sleeping at a hospital [versus] or sleeping at home."[1] This could be why so many people aren’t diagnosed with a sleep disorder, even though they really do have one.

Continue reading
  583 Hits
Tags:
583 Hits

Added Weight in Childhood Leads to Added Risk of Depression

New research from the Association for the Study of Obesity suggests that being overweight, especially during childhood, could increase the risk of developing major depression later in life. The CDC states that "the percentage of children with obesity in the U.S. has more than tripled since the 1970s," and that "today, about one in five school-aged children (ages 6–19) has obesity."[1] And with those added pounds comes the added risk for developing depression later in life.

The CDC defines obesity as "having excess body fat [which is] measured using the body mass index, or BMI, a widely-used screening tool for measuring both overweight and obesity...Children at or above the 95th percentile have obesity."1 Previous studies have shown that people who are obese are a greater risk of developing depression, but the new study from the Association for the Study of Obesity closely examined the link between early-life obesity and depression risk. The study, which analyzed 889 participants, found "that being overweight at age 8 or 13 was associated with more than triple the risk of developing major depression at some point in their lives, whilst carrying excess weight over a lifetime (both as a child and as an adult) quadrupled the chance of developing depression compared to only being overweight as an adult."[2]   

Continue reading
  522 Hits
522 Hits

Ditching the Dentist is Harmful to Overall Health

A recent study out of King’s College in London confirms that dental phobia, also known as odontophobia, leads to an increased incidence of tooth decay and tooth loss. It’s estimated that roughly 30 to 40 million people avoid going to the dentist because of dental phobia. With so many people steering clear of the dentist because of this, these new findings aren’t surprising, but they’re still problematic.

The new study confirms what U.S. dentists have been saying for years: skipping the dentist is harmful to your oral health. The study "found people with dental phobia tend to experience a range of dental diseases which result from their avoidance of the dentist."[i] But it also suggests that dodging the dentist can affect your quality of life.

Continue reading
  493 Hits
493 Hits

Need Braces? Don't Do-It-Yourself


The trend of do-it-yourself braces is sweeping the country, but many dentists and orthodontists warn patients that taking matters into their own hands could be dangerous and cause long-term damage. A quick Google search unlocks a plethora of DIY tutorials and videos ranging from how to grow your own windowsill herb garden to how to turn your bike into a Pokémon Go machine to how to make your own braces. While people may feel DIY braces are a cheaper alternative to going to the orthodontist to be fitted for braces, it may end of costing more in the long run.

According to a recent survey from the American Association of Orthodontists, 13 percent of orthodontists see patients who have attempted DIY teeth straightening.2 While the process of DIY braces may sound easy and quick, they can ultimately do more harm than good.[1] Reports indicate people are using rubber bands around two front teeth to draw the teeth together, closing the gap. Medical professionals say this may sound simple enough, but because the rubber band could imbed itself into the gum leading to an infection, it’s much more dangerous than people think. Additionally, the rubber band can travel to the root of the tooth causing the tooth to fall out.

Continue reading
  655 Hits
655 Hits

Untreated Sleep Apnea Could Cause Brain Damage in Children

New research suggests that children suffering from untreated obstructive sleep apnea show a significant reduction in gray matter of the brain. The study conducted by the University of Chicago Medical Center and published in the journal, Scientific Reports, conveys that "there is clear evidence of widespread neuronal damage or loss compared to the general population." [1] The findings of this recent study are especially troubling as it’s estimated that currently, three percent of children suffer from sleep apnea.

The University of Chicago Medical Center study analyzed 16 children with OSA and evaluated their sleep patterns overnight in its pediatric sleep laboratory. Children were administered neuro-cognitive testing and underwent brain scans with a non-invasive MRI. These results were compared with MRI images from nine healthy children of the same age, gender, ethnicity and weight, who did not suffer from sleep apnea.  

Continue reading
  1203 Hits
1203 Hits

Sweet Pickings: Could Strawberries Help Fight Oral Cancer?

According to a new pilot study conducted at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute, strawberries may help fight oral cancer in heavy smokers. April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month, so these findings come at an appropriate time. Presently, the Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that almost 50,000 Americans are diagnosed with oral cancer each year. With so many people being diagnosed annually, new preventative discoveries are especially crucial.

Continue reading
  466 Hits
466 Hits

What's Eating You: How Diet Impacts Migraines

A 2016 study confirms that diet can directly impact the prevalence of migraines. The saying, "you are what you eat" could not be truer when discussing diet and migraines. According to the Migraine Research Foundation, migraines are a serious neurological disease affecting roughly 38 million Americans. It is the sixth most disabling illness in the world. Certain beverages, foods and food additives are known to trigger migraines and reducing or eliminating them completely can provide noticeable relief.

Continue reading
  617 Hits
617 Hits

Oral Health and Overall Health: How Each Impacts the Other

Oral health offers both clues to the state of overall health and allows dentists to identify health issues before other medical providers. Because people typically visit their dentists twice a year, dentists are usually the first to notice health problems. The state of our oral health is also a sign for other serious medical issues.

Continue reading
  436 Hits
436 Hits

Sick and Tired: How the Immune System Suffers When We Don’t Sleep

A new study suggests that chronic sleep deprivation can negatively impact the immune system, leading to an increased incidence of illness. The study, conducted by the University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine, confirms how the immune system is compromised when the body is not fully rested. Many factors can cause and contribute to sleep deprivation, so it is important to recognize the signs and risk factors to combat sleep deprivation early on.

Continue reading
  617 Hits
617 Hits

A Royal Pain: How and Why Chronic Pain Affects Women Greater than Men

A recent study conducted by Georgia State University found that women experienced higher incidences of chronic, inflammatory pain than men and that pain medications like morphine are thereby a less effective pain management tool. According to the Institute of Medicine, more than 100 million Americans suffer from some form of chronic pain, with women compromising the bulk of that. The American Chronic Pain Association defines chronic pain as an "ongoing or recurrent pain, lasting beyond the usual course of acute illness or injury or more than 3 to 6 months, and which adversely affects the individual’s well-being." [1] For many women, chronic pain can present in a variety of ways including fibromyalgia, arthritis, headaches and even temporomandibular joint disorder, more commonly known as TMJ. The Georgia State University Study sheds new light on how women are suffering substantially more than their male counterparts and why that just might be.

Continue reading
  430 Hits
430 Hits

Up All Night? TMJ May be to Blame

If you’re not getting a good night’s sleep and can’t figure out why, temporomandibular joint disorder, more commonly known as TMJ, may be to blame. TMJ is a serious condition that is characterized by pain in the jaw joint and the muscles controlling jaw movement that can impact jaw mobility, and unbeknownst to many Americans, it could be the source of their sleep loss.  

 

Continue reading
  515 Hits
515 Hits

Saying a Mouthful: How Our Ancestors Teeth Tell An Evolutionary Story

Anthropologists have learned a great deal about human evolution from fossilized remains, and one of the most information-rich sources are human teeth. Our teeth, as well as our ancestor's teeth, tell a very specific evolutionary story, and it's a story anthropologists have been "reading" for many years. Because teeth are typically the most preserved skeletal remains found in fossils, they are a natural fit for researchers to examine.In her new book, "What Teeth Reveal about Human Evolution," Ohio State University anthropology professor Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg discusses how and why modern human teeth are vastly different from our ancestors. The thread that weaves its way through the entirety of her book is that "we have teeth that were adapted for eating a very different diet than the one we eat today"  and how, as a result, that reality can cause a number of health issues and concerns.

Continue reading
  625 Hits
625 Hits

Not a Wink of Sleep: How Sleep Deprivation Impacts Memories

In a recent study conducted by scientists at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the study involving mice showed how sleep deprivation and other factors that disrupt the sleep cycle could inhibit the brain’s ability to form new memories. With somewhere between 50 and 70 million Americans suffering from a sleep disorder, sleep deprivation could be significantly more prevalent among this population. The Johns Hopkins study states that the "key purpose of sleep is to recalibrate the brain cells responsible for learning and memory so the animals can "solidify" lessons learned and use them when they awaken,"  and anything that impacts the sleep cycle could change the trajectory of human memory.

Continue reading
  460 Hits
460 Hits

Losing Sleep and Dollars: How Undiagnosed Sleep Apnea is Costing America Billions

More than 13 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, and with many of those people not being treated or even diagnosed, it comes as no surprise that this treatable disorder is doing more than keeping Americans up at night; it’s costing them some serious dollars. In August 2016, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) released the results of an analysis that effectively breaks down how untreated and undiagnosed sleep apnea is costing America more than $150 billion every year. What’s perhaps more problematic is these staggering costs aren’t necessary and can be significantly reduced (if not eliminated) by properly diagnosing and treating sleep apnea.

Continue reading
  372 Hits
372 Hits

Sinking into Depression? Why Social Media Use May be to Blame

The wide accessibility of social media platforms on electronic devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and computers has given rise to a number of health conditions, including depression. In fact, the excessive use of social media among young adults could lead to an increased risk for depression as well as other health issues. According to a national survey conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Center for Research on Media, Technology and Health (CRMTH), "people who report using seven to 11 social media platforms had more than three times the risk of depression and anxiety than their peers who use zero to two platforms."[1] While the ability to stay plugged in in this fast-paced society has become the norm, it is fraught with peril.

Continue reading
  476 Hits
476 Hits

Contact Us

Your Name(*)
Please let us know your name.

Your Email(*)
Please let us know your email address.

Subject(*)
Please write a subject for your message.

Message(*)
Please let us know your message.

Captcha(*)
Captcha
Refresh Invalid Input