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New Study Shows Oral Health Linked to Esophageal Cancer

A new study published in the journal Cancer Research shows evidence to suggest that oral bacteria may increase the risk of esophageal cancer. Two large studies were conducted in which oral wash samples were collected from 122,000 participants, and their oral bacteria was assessed. After 10 years, 106 of those participants had developed cancer of the esophagus. Through analysis of the participant data, researchers found that some oral bacteria were linked to a higher risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

The oral bacteria that causes gum disease has also been linked to other cancers such as oral, neck and head cancers in other research, according to Dr. David Buck, DDS, founder of Balance Epigenetic Orthodontics in Lynnwood, Washington.  

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579 Hits

Hot Flashes Linked to Sleep Apnea

A new study published in the journal of the North American Menopause Society examines the potential link between hot flashes and obstructive sleep apnea in menopausal women. Researchers discovered that women who reported experiencing severe hot flashes were 1.87 times more at risk for obstructive sleep apnea than those who reported only mild or no hot flashes.

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672 Hits

How Posture Affects Oral Health

Posture is a cause for concern for many in the medical field as people spend more and more time looking down at mobile devices, hunched over laptops or sitting at computers at work day after day. Medical professionals agree that poor posture can put a strain on the entire body, but many people are surprised to find out it can also have a negative effect on their smile.

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560 Hits

Chronic Migraines Linked to TMJ Disorder

Researchers from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil have discovered that patients suffering from chronic migraine attacks more than 15 days a month are three times more likely to have severe TMJ disorder symptoms than patients with only episodic migraines.

"It makes sense when you think about basic anatomy," said Dr. David Buck, DDS, an innovative orthodontist who treats both TMJ disorders and migraine conditions in his Lynwood, Washington, practice.

"The temporomandibular joint is located on each side of the face, just in front of the ear," he said. "You can feel it by placing your hands there and opening and closing your mouth. This joint connects the jaw to the skull, so anything that causes pain in the jaw could easily radiate upward and cause headaches or migraines."

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493 Hits

Undiagnosed Sleep Apnea a Serious Danger

According to a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology titled "Increased Prevalence of Sleep-disordered Breathing in Adults," 5.9 million American adults have been diagnosed with sleep apnea, but 23.5 million remain undiagnosed.

Sleep apnea has made headlines in recent years, bringing awareness to the dangers of the condition. For example, when actress Carrie Fisher died last year, sleep apnea was listed as one of the leading causes of death.

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1604 Hits

Could Glass Toothpaste Help Repair Damaged Teeth?

A research team from Queen Mary University in London have developed a new "bioactive" glass designed to help repair decaying teeth. The glass dissolves quickly to form chemicals that mimic tooth minerals to help restore the damaged teeth. The toothpaste has already been launched by the university's company, BioMin Technologies Ltd., under the name BioMinC. Last year, the team developed a fluoride-containing glass toothpaste called BioMinF. The new product, BioMinC, uses chloride-containing glass as an alternative for those who choose to forego fluoride toothpaste or for those in areas where the water is already fluoridated.

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529 Hits

How to Brush With Braces

For anyone new to braces, learning how to care for your teeth and the wires being used to shape them can seem like a confusing, complicated process. In many ways, brushing your teeth after you’ve had braces put on is very similar to the routine you likely had before braces. However, there are a few things to consider.

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1462 Hits

Sleep Apnea Treatment Could Help Delay Onset of Age-Related Diseases

Sleep apnea affects over 100 million people worldwide, and many researchers believe the disorder is still largely undiagnosed. Two of the most well-known and common risk factors are obesity and advanced age. Researchers in Portugal published an article in the medical journal Trends in Molecular Medicine expressing their concern that as human life expectancy continues to increase, the need for delaying or stopping the onset of age-related diseases becomes more important than ever. The research team believes that sleep apnea is connected to the onset of some of the most concerning age-related diseases.

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603 Hits

5 Myths About Sleep Apnea

Word of mouth can be a powerful thing. However, when it comes to passing along information that isn't true, it can be frustrating and at times downright dangerous. Sleep apnea is a serious condition and if not diagnosed can lead to a host of problems. One of the reasons Dr. Buck is so passionate about caring for patients with sleep apnea is the many myths that surround the disorder. Here are five myths about sleep apnea you should know about:

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3385 Hits

Finding New Ways to Diagnose Sleep Apnea

For many couples, nighttime can be stressful because of a snoring spouse. It may seem like just an annoying habit, but snoring can be a sign of something more serious, such as sleep apnea. If that's the case, it could be time to seek professional treatment.

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575 Hits

Are Cavities Contagious?

We all dread cold and flu season, when every cough or sneeze from a neighbor could spell disaster for not only ourselves, but also the whole family. But who would have thought that sharing food and drinks or swapping spit in a kiss would also leave us more at risk for cavities?  

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550 Hits

Could This Medication Help Treat Sleep Apnea?

According to a new study from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University, researchers believe they have discovered a drug that could lower the frequency of apneic episodes in patients with sleep apnea. The medication, dronabinol, is currently used to help chemotherapy patients deal with nausea and vomiting during treatments.  

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699 Hits

Sleep Apnea Linked to Memory and Attention Problems

New research published recently in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society shows a newly discovered link between sleep-breathing disorders such as sleep apnea and problems with memory and paying attention.  

The study looked at 1,700 adults using technology in their home environment to measures things like oxygen levels and other functions during sleep. Researchers determined that those with less than 90 percent oxygen saturation levels, which is a clear marker for sleep apnea, scored much lower on memory and attention tests. Researchers believe the lack of oxygen can damage blood vessels in the brain and cause inflammation that can result in nerve cell loss and lead to cognitive problems. 

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1105 Hits

Marijuana Causes Dry Mouth: Why it Matters

As the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes, and in some states recreational purposes, becomes more widespread, it’s important to look into one of the most well-known side effects of its use. Dry mouth, or xerostoma in the medical and dental community, occurs for many reasons. It can be a side effect of medication, a medical condition or the result of using marijuana.

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1289 Hits

New Study Shows Link Between Feelings of Purpose in Life and Better Sleep

 New research from a study conducted at Northwestern University in Chicago has found that a sense of purpose in life could help people sleep better. The study looked at over 800 people ages 60 to 100. Question about sleep quality and motivations in life were the core focus of the study and the researchers discovered that those who felt their lives had more meaning were actually less likely to have sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome along with a higher quality of sleep overall. The new study was published in the journal of Sleep Science and Practice.

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1231 Hits

Walks on the Beach May Help Improve Dental Anxiety

 Most people dread going to the dentist for even the most common treatments, but what if you could transport yourself to another world during the procedure? Researchers at the University of Plymouth set out to discover if using virtual reality in a dental setting could help improve patient experience and their findings were very interesting.

The study separated participants into three groups. The first group, the control group, received their dental treatments as usual with no distractions or interventions. The second group used a virtual reality headset to stroll through the streets of a random city during their procedure. The third group wore the virtual reality headsets and walked along a beach in Devon, England.

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1222 Hits

SPG Block Helps Migraine Sufferers Find Relief

According to the Migraine Research Foundation, migraines affect 38 million Americans and one billion people worldwide including men, women and children. It’s the third most common illness in the world and the sixth most disabling. In fact, every 10 seconds, someone in the United States visits the emergency room for head pain said Dr. David Buck, DDS, a neuromuscular dentist in Washington.

"Migraines are considered chronic when a patient experiences at least 15 a month over the course of three months," he said. "People who don’t suffer from these painful attacks have the tendency to brush them off as just bad headaches with little sympathy for the patient. But, 90 percent of migraine sufferers can’t function at all, let alone work, drive or socialize during a migraine."

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999 Hits

The Serious and Somber Reality of Sleep Apnea

With the recent news that actress Carrie Fisher died as a result of sleep apnea and other additional complications, this serious health condition is making headlines across the country. Though officials cannot conclusively determine the exact cause of death, it appears that sleep apnea likely played a role. If left untreated, sleep apnea is harmful to your health and can quickly become dangerous.

What is Sleep Apnea?
The Greek word "apnea" translates to "without breath. As such, sleep apnea is a structural problem characterized by repeated cessations or pauses in breathing during sleep. Typically, the airway collapses during deeper levels of sleep, compromising breathing and interrupting sleep. Millions of American suffer from the disorder, and it affects their everyday way of life, impacting work performance, personal relationships and daily functioning.

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1003 Hits

A Smarter Way to Sleep: Using Smartphones to Diagnose Sleep Disorders

Sleep disorders are often evaluated and diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG), which measures brain activity, eye movement and heart rhythms during sleep, but a new type of technology designed by researchers out of Osaka University utilizes a smartphone to help diagnose sleep disorders. It uses machine learning via a smartphone to help determine if a patient is suffering from a sleep disorder.

Using Modern Technology to Diagnose Sleep Disorders
According to Osaka University Associate Professor Ken-ichi Fukui, PSGs are ineffective because they require a patient to be monitored outside of their natural sleeping environment, typically in a sleep lab or other medical facility. He believes that because "our environment influences how we sleep...we should not expect the same patterns sleeping at a hospital [versus] or sleeping at home."[1] This could be why so many people aren’t diagnosed with a sleep disorder, even though they really do have one.

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646 Hits

Added Weight in Childhood Leads to Added Risk of Depression

New research from the Association for the Study of Obesity suggests that being overweight, especially during childhood, could increase the risk of developing major depression later in life. The CDC states that "the percentage of children with obesity in the U.S. has more than tripled since the 1970s," and that "today, about one in five school-aged children (ages 6–19) has obesity."[1] And with those added pounds comes the added risk for developing depression later in life.

The CDC defines obesity as "having excess body fat [which is] measured using the body mass index, or BMI, a widely-used screening tool for measuring both overweight and obesity...Children at or above the 95th percentile have obesity."1 Previous studies have shown that people who are obese are a greater risk of developing depression, but the new study from the Association for the Study of Obesity closely examined the link between early-life obesity and depression risk. The study, which analyzed 889 participants, found "that being overweight at age 8 or 13 was associated with more than triple the risk of developing major depression at some point in their lives, whilst carrying excess weight over a lifetime (both as a child and as an adult) quadrupled the chance of developing depression compared to only being overweight as an adult."[2]   

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586 Hits

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