2322 196th St. SW, Suite 201 Lynnwood, WA 98036 | Call Us Today! 206-316-8286

DSCN1769.jpeg
Slide 2
PlayPause
Slider

What Is Digital Smile Design?

​ What do you do when your smile makes you unhappy? We feel happier and a lot more confident when we smile, and we exude a kind of positivity. So when we're unhappy with our smile, we smile less often and it can actually begin to affect our confidence and mood. A Cosmetic Procedure That Enhances Your Smile When you deal with a smile you're less tha...
Continue reading
  89 Hits
89 Hits

Dwarfism: Helping Develop the Mid-Face

​ Children who are born with achondroplasia, the most common form of dwarfism, suffer from a genetic condition that only affects about one in 15,000 to 40,000 people, according to MedLine, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Aside from the most well-known symptoms of this condition, which include shorter stature, upper arms and thi...
Continue reading
  3250 Hits
3250 Hits

Correcting Mouth Breathing Can Help Children Avoid Braces

​ Is there evidence your child is not breathing correctly? This can start as early as 4 to 6 years old. Is your child not sleeping well, or is he snoring? This is a sign there is a problem with the airway, which means there will be a change or problem with the growth and development of the face. Children who undergo growth treatment with Dr. Buck a...
Continue reading
  5649 Hits
5649 Hits

Treating Children During Their Growing Years

When it comes to our children, we always want to do what's best for them, but sometimes it's genuinely hard to know what exactly that is. This is especially true when it comes to their health and development. With so many conflicting philosophies and advice from different books, experts and even television shows, it's frustrating to say the least. ...
Continue reading
  1426 Hits
1426 Hits

What Is Malocclusion?

You may have heard the word before at your dentist, but have you ever wondered what malocclusion actually is? The word malocclusion means "bad bite," and it refers to the way the teeth and jaw fit together when the mouth is closed. If things don't fit correctly, this is considered malocclusion. It can lead to pain in the jaw, teeth, ears, head and ...
Continue reading
  2175 Hits
2175 Hits

What Is Epigenetics?

One of the first questions we’re asked by new and prospective patients when they hear our name, Balance Epigenetic Orthodontics, is, What exactly is epigenetics and what does it mean when it comes to dentistry? Read on to learn the basics about epigenetics and our revolutionary strategy at oral care and development, and what it means for you or your loved one.

Continue reading
  650 Hits
650 Hits

Early Dental Visits Mean Healthier Teeth for Life

A recent survey from the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Michigan shows that one in six parents who have received no advice from doctors are likely to wait until age 4 or older to seek dental care for their children, even though the recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Dental Association suggest dental care should begin no later than age 1 or when the first teeth appear.

Early dental visits are extremely important in promoting a lifetime of healthy teeth and oral health habits, said Dr. David Buck, founder of Balance Epigenetic Orthodontics in Lynnwood, Washington.

Continue reading
  652 Hits
652 Hits

Why Nasal Breathing Is So Important in Childhood

The brain grows rapidly during the first 6 years of life and in turn, the cranium is growing, as well. This cranium growth influences the facial growth until about age 6 as this is when the cranium usually stops growing. However, the face continues to grow out from under the cranium until puberty.

After age 6, one of the key influences of facial growth is nasal breathing. In order for the face to grow as it should the tongue needs to be in the right position in the palate, the lips need to be sealed and breathing must be nasal. To achieve ideal function and aesthetics of the face these three things must happen during these key developmental years.

Continue reading
  10500 Hits
10500 Hits

Tips for Helping Kids with Dental Anxiety

Is your child having a hard time going to the dentist without getting upset? They’re not alone. Statistics show that children between the ages of 8 and 12 experience the most anxiety when it comes to a dental visit. Of course, dental anxiety can happen at any age, so here are a few tips to help kids handle their fears.

Continue reading
  2457 Hits
2457 Hits

How Posture Affects Oral Health

Posture is a cause for concern for many in the medical field as people spend more and more time looking down at mobile devices, hunched over laptops or sitting at computers at work day after day. Medical professionals agree that poor posture can put a strain on the entire body, but many people are surprised to find out it can also have a negative effect on their smile.

Continue reading
  764 Hits
764 Hits

A Guide to the Best Halloween Treats for Teeth

It’s no secret that sugar can wreak havoc on your teeth, but that’s no reason not to enjoy the holiday festivities that come with the fall season. Here’s a guide to some better treat choices that will sweeten your Halloween fun without hurting your teeth.

Continue reading
  4064 Hits
4064 Hits

Added Weight in Childhood Leads to Added Risk of Depression

New research from the Association for the Study of Obesity suggests that being overweight, especially during childhood, could increase the risk of developing major depression later in life. The CDC states that "the percentage of children with obesity in the U.S. has more than tripled since the 1970s," and that "today, about one in five school-aged children (ages 6–19) has obesity."[1] And with those added pounds comes the added risk for developing depression later in life.

The CDC defines obesity as "having excess body fat [which is] measured using the body mass index, or BMI, a widely-used screening tool for measuring both overweight and obesity...Children at or above the 95th percentile have obesity."1 Previous studies have shown that people who are obese are a greater risk of developing depression, but the new study from the Association for the Study of Obesity closely examined the link between early-life obesity and depression risk. The study, which analyzed 889 participants, found "that being overweight at age 8 or 13 was associated with more than triple the risk of developing major depression at some point in their lives, whilst carrying excess weight over a lifetime (both as a child and as an adult) quadrupled the chance of developing depression compared to only being overweight as an adult."[2]   

Continue reading
  684 Hits
684 Hits

Treating Our Tiniest Patients Early On

Many parents are told by their child’s dentist or orthodontist that correcting a misaligned bite or crooked teeth while their child doesn’t have their permanent teeth yet isn’t possible or effective. While putting braces on baby teeth isn’t a valid option, there are alternatives to correct jaw and teeth issues while your child is still young. In fact, Dr. Buck prefers to work with his tiniest patients sooner rather than later, and here’s why.

If your child has crooked teeth or a misaligned bite, leaving the issue untreated can lead to long-term issues such as sleep apnea or TMJ disorder. But the traditional orthodontic approach is to wait to treat the issue until the child’s permanent teeth have come in. According to Dr. Buck, while this approach may be easier, you miss significant growth opportunities that allow you to fully treat the issue in one shot.

Continue reading
  839 Hits
839 Hits

Untreated Sleep Apnea Could Cause Brain Damage in Children

New research suggests that children suffering from untreated obstructive sleep apnea show a significant reduction in gray matter of the brain. The study conducted by the University of Chicago Medical Center and published in the journal, Scientific Reports, conveys that "there is clear evidence of widespread neuronal damage or loss compared to the general population." [1] The findings of this recent study are especially troubling as it’s estimated that currently, three percent of children suffer from sleep apnea.

The University of Chicago Medical Center study analyzed 16 children with OSA and evaluated their sleep patterns overnight in its pediatric sleep laboratory. Children were administered neuro-cognitive testing and underwent brain scans with a non-invasive MRI. These results were compared with MRI images from nine healthy children of the same age, gender, ethnicity and weight, who did not suffer from sleep apnea.  

Continue reading
  2146 Hits
2146 Hits

Oral Health and Overall Health: How Each Impacts the Other

Oral health offers both clues to the state of overall health and allows dentists to identify health issues before other medical providers. Because people typically visit their dentists twice a year, dentists are usually the first to notice health problems. The state of our oral health is also a sign for other serious medical issues.

Continue reading
  622 Hits
622 Hits

Saying a Mouthful: How Our Ancestors Teeth Tell An Evolutionary Story

Anthropologists have learned a great deal about human evolution from fossilized remains, and one of the most information-rich sources are human teeth. Our teeth, as well as our ancestor's teeth, tell a very specific evolutionary story, and it's a story anthropologists have been "reading" for many years. Because teeth are typically the most preserved skeletal remains found in fossils, they are a natural fit for researchers to examine.In her new book, "What Teeth Reveal about Human Evolution," Ohio State University anthropology professor Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg discusses how and why modern human teeth are vastly different from our ancestors. The thread that weaves its way through the entirety of her book is that "we have teeth that were adapted for eating a very different diet than the one we eat today"  and how, as a result, that reality can cause a number of health issues and concerns.

Continue reading
  827 Hits
827 Hits

A Waste of Breath: How Mouth-breathing is Hurting Your Child

Not all breathing is created equal, and what’s surprising to many parents is how mouth-breathing is harmful to their children. Mouth-breathing in early childhood can lead to a number of health issues such as sleep deprivation and sleep apnea. In fact, current research suggests a link between poor sleep and ADHD. Dr. Buck routinely sees young patients in his practice who struggle with mouth-breathing. The goal is to get these kiddos breathing out of their noses, also known as nasal breathing. With some help and support from Dr. Buck, parents can make this happen.

Continue reading
  1509 Hits
1509 Hits

Early Introduction of Peanut Foods and Epigenetics Could Affect Peanut Allergy Development

Peanut allergies affect an estimated three million people in the U.S., and while there is currently no known cure or treatment, new research suggests that introducing peanut-containing foods during infancy may help prevent the development of a peanut allergy. As of January 2017, an expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) issued this new recommendation for peanut-containing foods. While these new guidelines may help reduce the incidence of children developing peanut allergies, a 2015 study suggests that genes and epigenetics also play a role.

Continue reading
  639 Hits
639 Hits

Children Suffering from Sleep Apnea are at an Increased Risk for Depression

When sleeping becomes difficult or interrupted for children as a result of sleep apnea, this serious disruption could lead to equally serious issues such a depression or behavioral problems. A good night’s rest is crucial for everyone, but it is especially important for children, whose minds and bodies are developing at rapid rates. A child who suffers from sleep apnea will experience interrupted breathing and disrupted sleep and is unable to obtain adequate rest. Too little sleep can have dire health consequences and can lead to depression.

Continue reading
  493 Hits
493 Hits

How a Misaligned Bite Can be Game-Changing for Athletes

With basketball and football season in full swing, athletes are expected to perform their best, but recent research suggests that dental malocclusions could impact posture, balance, and athletic performance. A straight and properly aligned smile is more than just cosmetic; it’s healthy and functional in more ways than one. According to two new studies conducted by the Department of Physiology at the University of Barcelona in Spain and the University of Innsbruck in Austria, researchers have confirmed a link between a misaligned bite and postural control. It may seem like a stretch that researchers have found a correlation between the two, but it’s not too surprising once you understand the anatomical logistics.

Continue reading
  695 Hits
695 Hits

Contact Us

Your Name(*)
Please let us know your name.

Your Email(*)
Please let us know your email address.

Subject(*)
Please write a subject for your message.

Message(*)
Please let us know your message.

Captcha(*)
Captcha
Refresh Invalid Input

DR. BUCK'S PHILOSOPHY

Epigenetic Orthodontics can open and protect the airway enhancing breathing both during sleep and awake activities.

Dr. Buck practices a philosophy that integrates airway into all diagnosis and treatments. Dentistry has traditionally not considered the airway when planning dental treatments. Fortunately, today there is a rapidly growing movement that now recognizes how dentistry can have an impact on the airway which affects breathing during sleep. If dental treatments, including TMJ, orthopedic and orthodontics are well planned the result can be that the airway is protected or even enhanced. There is a clear link between underdeveloped and retruded jaws together with narrow dental arches that puts a patient at risk for sleep breathing disorders.

Please visit this site for more information; Airway Health

WOW! A 54% decrease in forward head posture; 164% increase in the antero-posterior size of the airway; 176% increase in the lateral size of the airway all from epigenetically centered jaw development orthopedics. This is the future of orthodontics!​
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image